UPDATE:  64,000 daily clicks funded this project – thank you!

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These wonderful mammals, these Manatees,  these amazing Sea Cows really can “Sooth the Savage Breast”

GreaterGood

Offset 16 Tons Of Carbon By Planting Sea Grass For Manatees

Help restore critical marine habitat and offset your carbon footprint.

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Seagrasses grow in shallow coastal regions of every continent on Earth except Antarctica. These hidden meadows are incredibly important ecosystems, providing crucial habitat for thousands of species of fish, plants, and invertebrates, as well as providing food for animals like sea turtles and manatees. They also play a critical role in the fight against global warming: an acre of seagrass can store more than twice the carbon stored by an acre of pristine rainforest, and seagrass habitats are up to 45 times more effective in their carbon uptake and storage abilities.

Unfortunately, because these beautiful underwater fields are hidden from our view, the disastrous destruction of seagrasses worldwide has gone largely unnoticed by the general public. Scientists estimate that we lose a seagrass meadow the size of a soccer field every 20 minutes–a rate faster than global deforestation. Most of this loss is caused by human activities such as coastal development, boat groundings, and propeller scars. The damage a boat propeller can do in five seconds can take five to fifty years to heal.

SeaGrass Grow!, a program of the Ocean Foundation, works to restore damaged seagrass, plant new seagrass, and increase public awareness to eliminate destructive human behavior and conserve our coastal meadows. Your support protects and restores threatened coastal seagrass, offsetting carbon emissions, providing habitat that supports global fish populations, and supplying a critical food source for large sea mammals like the manatee.

You can make a difference today. Just click to support the work of the Ocean Foundation and save these vital ecosystems!

HERE IS A WAY TO CONTRIBUTE WITHOUT PULLING OUT YOUR WALLET, JUST GO TO THE SITE AND CLICK THE TAB EACH DAY…YOU KNOW THE DRILL…CLICK IT  ~~dru~~

ManateesFromWikipedia.jpg photo from Wikipedia

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http://www.livescience.com/27405-manatees.html